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Observer II

Supply chains ?

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Just watched a prog on how our loaf of bread is produced - quite interesting.  But what I find strange is the dependency on road miles by HGVs in our production processes.  Instead of having one huge factory that produces the component parts/ingredients, they are all sourced from other factories and driven on our roads by HGVs. This will no doubt be further exacerbated by different companies all having their seperate supply depots and sourcing.  This is made even worse by our involvement in the EU. EG: Vauxhall Astra car engines are assembled a London factory from parts sourced fro France and Spain, all delivered by HGVs (hence queues at Dover);  the finished engines are then loaded onto HGVs and transported to Germany for assembly into the finished car.  Whilst I can see the political reasons behind this IE dispersal of employment and forced inter-dependency;  I can't see it as economical, efficient or enviromentally friendly. 

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I think road transport in any country is a cash cow for its respective governments with all the tax involved. Governments that really only pay lip service to saving the planet & will do their bit for such by raising taxes to benefit themselves.

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It's something that has evolved Dave;  I once asked a CEO of M&S, where does he get his potatoes from - A. From farms in Scotland.  And where do they go from there - A. down the M6 to our depot in Birmingham. And to your shops in Warrington - A. Up the M6 from the Depot.  Bare in mind every Company will have their own distribution network.  So I'm surprised the tree huggers haven't picked up on this one.  

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You're looking for a problem that doesn't exist Obs. Supply chains have evolved because they are the most efficient and economic method, i.e. to reduce not increase costs and therefore maximise profit.

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Well from an enviromental standpoint, there is an air pollution problem - think that's a given.  From an efficency and economic standpoint, I fail to see how such extensive road journeys contribute. Such systems aren't planned like a factory layout,  they evolve from a multiplicity of different companies forming ad-hoc links.  And yes your right about costs; international supply chains have evolved based on cheap labour sources, thus cheaper costs.  In the EU, there is an added political reason, of creating economic inter-dependency and sharing out employment - like airbus for example.

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Just because you "fail to see" doesn't mean you're right. An ad hoc link is a solution designed for a specific problem or task (unless you really mean hock: " the joint in a quadruped's hind leg between the knee and the fetlock, the angle of which points backwards.") so it is a planned solution. Why would you think any company would go out of it's way to make its operations uneconomical and/or inefficient? As for the environmental aspects, we have a multiplicity of legislation dealing with that, and a multiplicity of taxes paid due to said legislation so, again, why would any company willingly pay out extra money if it wasn't to enhance the business in some way?

As for Airbus and the EU, Airbus is based in an EU country (Netherlands) but has manufacturing facilities in other European countries as well as China and the US, so your attempt to link it with politics is a bit tenuous.

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I'm not claiming "to be right", just making an observation.  Like, it's OK to pollute our Towns and Cities with diesel particulates, as long as your paying a tax, and because the taxes must be cheap, it's all economical. Sure the record number of kids with respiratory diseases will understand.  🙄      Companies don't "go out of their way to make their operations inefficient";  they use established contacts or the cheapest source, regardless of air or road miles.    The airbus project was split between the UK and France, who supplied the major parts of the plane (wings and fuselage), no doubt additional parts were sourced from other places; it could easily have been produced at one single factory, but for EU political considerations.  

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You are far off base with Airbus. Look at their rival Boeing and how they outsource the parts for their planes:

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/36507420/ns/business-us_business/t/hundreds-suppliers-one-boeing-airplane/

Same horse, different jockey. China is now making some Airbus models in, surprise surprise, China (which wasn't in political union with the EU last time I looked). This is the way of the world Obs whether you like it or not.

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I was talking about the original contract scenario;  no doubt they realised there's an abundance of cheap labour in China, so no surprise for a multi-national corp.

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One of the advantages of supply chains in road transport terms is that depots are strategically placed so as drivers can always get there & back comfortably in their scheduled hours. As a result, the actual transport hardware ,vehicles, can be kept to a minimum  but  be double or even treble shifted during a 24 hour period. Looks good in theory anyway. As with all industry though ,the bigger an operation becomes the more gremlins creep into the machine.

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1 hour ago, asperity said:

You are far off base with Airbus. Look at their rival Boeing and how they outsource the parts for their planes:

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/36507420/ns/business-us_business/t/hundreds-suppliers-one-boeing-airplane/

Same horse, different jockey. China is now making some Airbus models in, surprise surprise, China (which wasn't in political union with the EU last time I looked). This is the way of the world Obs whether you like it or not.

But it has to be the fault of the EU as in Observers eyes it is bad, ergo the EU must be to blame.

 

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29 minutes ago, Observer II said:

I was talking about the original contract scenario;  no doubt they realised there's an abundance of cheap labour in China, so no surprise for a multi-national corp.

The UK was part of the Airbus consortium before we even joined the EC never mind the EU.

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Seems the Germans are protesting at a ban on diesel vehicles in Stuttgart ,  the authorities are concerned at pollution levels.  Perhaps, given how the EU economic model depends on HGVs , they may start to rethink it.

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I think it's fair to say that ,under transport laws, most hgv & psv vehicles are less polluting than the car of Joe Public simply because of the strict laws relating to servicing hgv & psv . Many cars are not serviced effectively once they have left the forecourt.

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Think it's the particulates Dave, and that happens even with well maintained engines.   Read an article about Brexit and the supply chain, which claimed a cam shaft could cross the channel two or three times before coming to rest in a finished car.  Sorry but I just think it's crazy, and can't be efficient imo. Same thing is happening with livestock, meat on the hoof being taken to France for slaughter, then brought back as carcasses - crazy.

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 Unnecessary transport is ridiculous  & it is surprising how many vehicle actually run round the country empty.

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3 hours ago, Davy51 said:

 Unnecessary transport is ridiculous  & it is surprising how many vehicle actually run round the country empty.

Yes Davy, it's really terrible how these logistics operators send their trucks out empty just to keep their drivers busy 🙄

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